Diana: Her True Story – In Her Own Words by Andrew Morton

Diana: Her True Story - In Her Own Words

(Caidyn)

4/5

I’ll admit it: I’m a bit behind the times with this book. I had never heard of it until I was browsing my library’s online downloadable audiobook catalogue and saw this as an option. It wasn’t until I started listening to it that I found out the story behind this book. Diana, basically, wanted her words to get out and to set down her story before Prince Charles could. So, she worked with Morton and someone else. Morton gave the questions he had to the middle person, then the middle person asked her and they recorded the interview, then it went back to Morton. Pretty impressive since it was never discovered and no one really knew her involvement until after.

Even more so is my opinion on Diana. At this point, when this book was written, she was in the attack mode of her life. She wanted to attack Prince Charles and, at times, it shows. She wanted to put herself in the light of the poor, lied to, cheated upon wife. That’s a role she did to perfection, honestly. However, I also see Diana for what she was: an unbalanced woman who was fighting against a system and doing it in all the wrong ways. Having been friends with people who practice self-harm, attempted suicide, and had eating disorders among other problems, I know how Prince Charles felt. Trying to kill yourself in front of someone or harm yourself in front of them, and then blame them for your own mental anguish that they’re trying to help you with and trying to cope with themselves goes nowhere. The reactions he gave, while they’re seen as insensitive (and some really were), are understandable.

Sorry people who wholeheartedly love Princess Diana. But I hate the woman that she was in her younger years.

Then she grew older. She worked through her issues. Hell, if she and Charles had been able to talk a little bit more, they would have seen how much they had in common with one another. Issues with parents, feeling unloved and unappreciated, being constantly shoved to the side, etc. They have all of that in common and if they had been different people, they really could have done great things together.

The woman Diana was at the end of her life, I love. She had found her own and started coming out of her shell. It’s incredibly sad when you think of the life that was cut short when she was just starting to feel comfortable in her own skin.

While I did really enjoy this book, it’s very biased towards Diana. Never completely shuns or attacks the Royal family, but it is pro-Diana. Makes sense because it’s supposed to be her own words. This is a good book with great insight, but one has to be really aware of the biases going into this book.

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